Buildings We Deserve

Buildings We Deserve
Andrew Waugh shares his view of the “Buildings We Deserve”

While checking social media, I came a cross this article from ARCHITECTURE AU on LinkedIn.  The Austrailian publication has great content. “The Buildings We Deserve” is a Q&A with Andrew Waugh.  Andrew is the co-founder of Waugh Thistleton, a London-based architecture firm that specializes in Timber structures. Timber in much of the world is used to refer to lumber. More specifically, in the case of Waugh Thistleton, they are referencing Cross Laminated Timber (CLT).

Worldwide Appeal

Waugh Thistleton
The sign hanging on the street outside Waugh Thistleton’s London offices.

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NAHB Comments Highlight Need for Outreach

The following is from a Column that I write for Timber Processing Magazine and appears in the June 2017 issue.  Special thanks to Rich Donnell and the team at Hatton-Brown Publishing for providing the platform for me to share my thoughts.

A Hatton-Brown Publication
Timber Processing June 2017

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SLA 2017

What does SLA mean?  For those of you that haven’t been in the lumber world, it means Softwood Lumber Agreement.  This is used to refer to the agreement that the United States and Canada had for 10 years starting in 2006.  Essentially it is the agreement between the two nations that regulate the trade of softwood lumber.

Complicated Issue

This issue it complicated because there are so many different details. Since we have two countries supplying the same market it is important the playing field is level.

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North American Softwood Lumber: 20% Duty

Something finally happened.  The US government imposed a 20% duty on Canadian softwood lumber imports to the United States. Everyone seems to have an opinion.

Softwood Lumber ready for drying

For those that think this is something new, it’s not.  This dispute has been going on for decades and will continue far into the future.  Why, because both nations rely on each other, yet there are enough differences to cause market problems.  Let’s keep in mind that we just completed a decade-long (2006 -2016) Softwood Lumber Agreement that included duties and quotas on lumber entering the US marketplace from Canada. Continue reading “North American Softwood Lumber: 20% Duty”